Current and Recent Projects and Grants

NSF-IGERT in Genetic Pest Management

The National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (NSF-IGERT) in Genetic Pest Management encompasses of a number of research efforts by North Carolina State University faculty and students. The Genetic Pest Management (GPM) offers an opportunity to learn from past experiences and train a generation of students before wide-scale application creates consequences for which GPM researchers, and the communities these hope to aid, are poorly prepared. The pest species linked to such engineering range from insects to rodents and from pests of large-scale agriculture to invasive pests of endangered species. Students interested in GPM and, more broadly, in the social and ecological consequences of new technologies, must be able to evaluate whether, when, and how GPM technologies might be utilized. A. Binder and M. Cobb, and W. Kinsella work on this project. NSF-IGERT. Genetic Engineering and Society: The Case of Transgenic Pests." National Science Foundation Grant No. DGE-1068676
($1,199,509) PI: Fred Gould (NC State); co-PIs: Nicholas Haddad, Nora Haenn, Alun Lloyd, William Kinsella.

Public Perception of Reclaimed Water

Emily Zechman Berglund, assistant professor in civil, construction and environmental engineering, and Andrew Binder, assistant professor in communications have been awarded a National Science Foundation grant to, according to their NSF abstract, “explore the interplay between social and technical aspects of reclaimed, or recycled, water and will discover new ways for planning municipal water infrastructure and policy.” For more information, please see the following:

Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors and Technologies.

2012-2017. M. Cobb in a Sub-Thrust Leader for Social Implications/Risk Perceptions, NSF-NERC:
Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors and Technologies (ASSIST). ($18.5 million, 5 year center award). PI: Veena Misra (NC State).

Completed Projects

Nanotechnology Interdisciplinary Research Team (NIRT)

From 2008-2012, PCOST was associated with a 4 yr. $1.4 million NSF Nanotechnology Interdisciplinary Research Team (NIRT) grant to study how the public unpacks technical information about human toxicology of nanoparticles and nanotechnology. Dr. David Berube was Principal Investigator. He was joined by Dr. Vicki Colvin (Rice), Dr. Dietram Scheufele (Wisconsin), Dr. Pat Gehrke (South Carolina), and Dr. Jennifer Kuzma (Minnesota, now NC State).